Archive for the ‘non-Hindu infiltration’ Category

Hindu Temples of Tamilnadu under systematic destruction!

June 19, 2011

Hindu Temples of Tamilnadu under systematic destruction!

T. S. Subramanian has pointed out the deteriorating condition of murals in temples many times[1]. He should be congratulated to bring out such facts with concerned feelings expressed in his writings. However, the concerned and connected people have not taken any action to annul such vandalizing processes going on in the name of renovation, administration and other actions. The recent article “Targets of destruction” has been provoking, but we have to wait and see the response of the authorities.

Target of destruction: He starts with the appropriate beginning[2]: “Art, in more than 50 temples and three palaces in Tamil Nadu, is being mutilated” and explains the condition as follows: “Temples in Tamil Nadu are repositories of history, with inscriptions, sculptures, murals, bronzes, carvings, architecture and so on. The inscriptions provide valuable insights into the history of the period during which the temples were built, the village administration that prevailed, elections conducted for its assemblies, taxes collected, boards set up for the maintenance of lakes, ponds and canals, donation of land for Brahmin settlements, gifting gold for temple maintenance, etc.  There are more than 50 temples and three palaces in Tamil Nadu with murals. The palaces are Ramalinga Vilasam in Ramanathapuram and those at Bodinayakanur near Madurai and Padmanabhapuram in Kanyakumari district. While just four or five temples have murals dating back to the Pallava period (seventh to ninth century CE) and the Chola period (10th and 11th century CE), the majority of the murals belong to the Vijayanagar and the Nayak periods (14th to 17th century CE). The Brihadeeswara temple in Thanjavur have murals belonging to the Chola, the Nayak and the Maratha reigns.

Visual archivesThe mural masterpieces are visual archives on the history of the period, coronation rituals, the dress or the jewellery that men and women of those days wore, their hairstyle, musical instruments, the battles that they fought, the weapons used and so on. There are several Jain temples that have wonderful murals based on the Jain traditions, the Tirthankaras and the Yakshis. A favourite subject of many of the artists of those times was episodes from the Ramayana and the Mahabharata, and some of the artists even took care to write the labels for the episodes (captions) in Tamil or Telugu. Unfortunately in Tamil Nadu, the murals, the inscriptions, the sculptures and carvings have become targets of destruction and vandalism. The officials of the Hindu Religious and Charitable Endowments (HR and CE) Department, who administers the temples, are to be blamed for this state. Most often, these officials fail to appreciate and preserve these splendid works due to lack of knowledge of history.

How Meenakshi Temple was targeted? In the famous Meenakshi temple, Madurai, several historic mandapams have become shopping complexes. The Pudhu mandapam, the Ashta Sakti mandapam, Veera Vasantharayar mandapam and Meenakshi Nayakar mandapam teem with hundreds of shops, obstructing from view pillars with incredibly beautiful sculptures. A scholar on the history of the Meenakshi temple was displeased that its 1,000-pillared mandapam, with superb sculptures, has become ‘a studio’ now, with an incongruously gleaming granite floor, skewed focus lights and a big sculpture of Nataraja painted in black! Several years ago, the earthen bed of the temple’s famous ‘Golden Lotus’ tank (Pottramarai Kulam) was cemented up, with the result that no water stays in the tank now and it looks barren now. The HR and CE officials of the temple also whitewashed hundreds of beautiful murals, painted on the walls of the northern corridor of the Golden Lotus tank, portraying the ‘Tiruvilaiyadal,’ in the first quarter of 1996.

In a state of disrepair: While sculptures and carvings can survive for centuries because they have been chiselled out of granite, murals are vulnerable to nature. Since these murals were painted with natural dyes on mandapam walls or ceiling, they easily lend themselves to vandalism from devotees. Besides, they are exposed to sun or seepage of water from rain. Gaps between the granite slabs that form the roof of the mandapams lead to seepage of water due to rain and the sidewalls begin to ‘sweat.’ The lime plaster which forms the base for the murals has a tendency to absorb the water. When rain water falls on the murals painted on the ceiling or walls, fungus develops and the murals start peeling off. Smoke from the camphor (lit by the devotees) and from the oil lamps damage the paintings. Besides, they suffer from desecration at the hands of the HR and CE officials and devotees. Officials have fixed scores of metres of electric wires on the murals on the walls of the mandapams, installed switch boxes and tube lights on them, as it has happened in several places on the splendid murals in the Devaraja Swamy temple at Kanchipuram, portraying the 108 Divya Desam murals.

Other examples of vandalism: Extremely rare murals painted on wood in the Tirukkutraleeswarar temple at Tirukkutrala Chitra Sabha in Tirunelveli district have been vandalised. At the Siva temple at Patteeswaram, paintings were sandblasted in 1998 in the name of cleaning the surfaces on which they were painted. The paintings portrayed Lord Siva presenting a palanquin studded with pearls to the Saivite saint Tirugnana Sambandar because he could not bear to see his devotee walking in the sun. Temple officials sandblasted another row of paintings narrating the life of a mythical king who had no child but was blessed with a child after praying to Siva at Patteeswaram. Officials of the Lakshminarasimhar temple at Sevilimedu, near Kanchipuram, whitewashed them. They do not exist today.  Tales of destruction and desecration of these invaluable murals in temples in Tamil Nadu do not end with this list. What happened to the paintings at the Meenakshi temple at Madurai, the Trilokyanatha Jaina temple at Tiruparuttikunram near Kanchipuram, another Jaina temple at Karanthai near Kanchipuram and the Ramalinga Vilasam Palace in Ramanathapuram town take the cake.

Why this targested vattcks of vandalism? What the Mohammedan and the Europeans rulers could have done during their reigns is carried on in India, that too, after “independence” by the Indians by themselves. Ironically, “Hindu Religious & Endowment Board” under the control of proclaimed atheist, rationalist and particularly anti-Hindu ideologists for the last 70 years. The staff and officers entering into the department of HR&CE have been ideologists of all sorts of such category and some non-Hindus have also been there. And this vandalism is not done on one day, but carried on systematically. Whenever any official function comes, they carry out such destruction easily under the guise of celebration. The moment the temple comes under the control of HR&CE, any official comes into a temple, an office is constructed inside temple, that office is converted into some sort of lodge and then star-type accommodation, the temples start losing their sanctity. Perhaps, God is leaving the place. Under such circumstances, these modern day vandals, ideologists and rulers start their destruction.


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The Canard spread against Archaka Training, appointment etc.

October 26, 2010

The Canard spread against Archaka Training, appointment etc.

Anti-Hindu Government and atheist rulers: All Hindus are appointed as Archakas in all other States without any problem or issue. Only, in Tamilnadu, because of the atheist interefere, looting of temple propety, smuggling of idold and sculptures and Karunanidhi meddling with legal system, it has been politicized and controversialized.

Anti-Hindu and non-Hindu infiltration: Moreover, under the guise of  “Archaka” training, getting certificate etc., not only hard-core atheist temple-breaking gang but also non-Hindus, particularly, Christians have infiltrated into this new “Arckars” gang. Definitely, this cannot be allowed under the guise of Periyar, Paguttaravi, and other bogies. Already, one Muslim had filed a case for appointment in a temple, just because, he had the requirement of qualification of “Sanskrit”! But, this Muslim does not answer why if anybody could well-verse in Arabic / Urudu could get any appointment in a mosque? This is the hypocrisy revealed in atheist TN state.

In Tamil media, internet forums, an orchestrated propaganda has been carried on, of course, as usual  that Brahmins has stayed their appointment  at the supreme court! In fact, it was Brahmins who supported and encouraged such training, as could be seen below:

Archakar training starts

Staff Reporter, The Hindu, Sunday, May 13, 2007

http://www.hindu.com/2007/05/13/stories/2007051315360300.htm


NEW BEGINNING: Sri Ranganarayana Jeer of Srirangam giving away books and dhoties to a student in Tiruchi on Friday. The Collector, Ashish Vachchani (left), and the chairman of Board of Trustees of Srirangam Sri Ranganathaswamy Temple, M. Venkatachala m (second from left), look on. — PHOTO: R.M. RAJARATHINAM

TIRUCHI: It is a long-cherished dream for him. Although he wanted to become an `archakar,’ it could not materialise as he was from Scheduled Caste. With the doors now open through `Anaivarum archakar agalam’ scheme introduced by the State Government, the youth has grabbed the opportunity to join `Vaishnavite archakar’ training programme.

R. Karthikeyan (22) of Aeriyoor in Pennagaram taluk of Dharmapuri district was one among 40 youths who expressed their joy and pleasure at Sri Kattazhagiasingarperumal Temple in Tiruvanaikovil where the training programme for `Pancharatra agamam’ (Vaishnavite system of worship) was inaugurated on Friday. Explaining the economic backwardness of his family, he said that he would take maximum advantage of the programme. Distributing the training materials that included books and dhotis to the students to mark the inaugural of the training, Sri Ranganarayana Jeer of Srirangam said that it was only true service which was dear to God above caste based barriers. The scheme, he hoped, would prove to be a prospective career for many youths in future. The  Collector, Ashish Vachhani, said that Tamil Nadu had become a trendsetter to the whole country in implementing the scheme.

The Joint Commissioner, Hindu Religious and Charitable Endowments, M. K. Balasubramanian, pointed out that Tiruvanaikovil in Tiruchi was one of the two centres in the State selected for imparting the training on Vaishnavite system of worship, the other one being Sri Parthasarathy temple in Triplicane, Chennai. Each trainee would get a monthly stipend of Rs.500 and free accommodation and all basic amenities would be provided to them. A headmaster and a teacher would impart the training. The chairman of Board of Trustees of Srirangam Sri Ranganathaswamy Temple, M. Venkatachalam, said that in all 97 candidates appeared for the interview. Forty persons, belonging to different castes, were selected as per guidelines. Trustees Girija Mohan and T.R. Murali and the Executive Officer, P.R. Ashok, spoke.

Archaka students form association, demand employment (The Hindu, Tiruvannamalai, September 13, 2009)

Students of Archakar Training Schools which were formed by the State government at 6 famous temples in the State, to train candidates from across castes in the archakar profession, have formed an association and decided to demand the government the kind of employment they aspired for. The first set of students of Archakar Training School at Sri Arunachaleswarar Temple here, became dejected as they could not find employment even after they had successfully completed the one-year course stipulated by the government. “After we have formally completed the course, government suddenly extended the course in to second year, which was not part of the course initially. Though we obliged to this too, classes were held only for first two months of the second year. Now only teachers are getting salary but there is no certainty about our future. Even if there is a legal tangle no one is there to explain to us about the case and its position. So, we have formed an association named ‘Tamil Nadu Government Archakar Training Students Association’ on Saturday,” said Ranganathan, convener of the nascent association. “Our second step would be to convene a formal meeting at the State level and decide the form of action to be taken to get employment,” said V. Vijayakumar, another student of the same school, who hails from Rasipuram.